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“A great shock, and a great, great joy”: James Gleick’s CHAOS: Making a New Science.

Review: Chaos: Making a New Science by James Gleick. (Penguin: 1987/2012) 384 pp.

 

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The humble, fractal cauliflower. Its fractal structure is evident in the way that its structural patterns repeat over and over again on ever-smaller scales. 

 

There are two ways of looking at it. From one perspective, the fact that I was stunned and shocked by a 26 year-old book subtitled “Making a New Science” was depressing; I mean, why hadn’t I learned this stuff 26 years ago? From the other, the fact that James Gleick’s magnificent book Chaos: Making a New Science (Penguin: 1987, 384 pp.) still had the power to blow my mind merely reinforces the book’s central thesis: Chaos theory can be overwhelmingly obvious and invisible at the same time. Like gravity, it was always a central fact that governed everything we did, it just took a genius like Isaac Newton to “discover” it.  I’m grateful and humbled to finally have discovered this book.

I was already a huge fan of his most recent book, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood (Vintage: 2012, 544 pp.) so I was ready to like Chaos. But he does something different in each book. In The Information Gleick starts with something we’re all familiar with, the World Wide Web, and lifts the screen to reveal how it got there. Along the way it becomes the story of the alphabet, the “talking” drums of Africa, Morse Code and a million other forms of communication. It’s a masterpiece.

In Chaos Gleick goes in the opposite direction, taking seemingly unpredictable phenomena — global weather, long-term stock market pricing, the timing intervals of a dripping faucet — and revealing that “within the most disorderly realms of data lived an unexpected order.” Chaos theory, which applies to dynamical systems, is a bizarre mix of predictability (when a dynamical process involving three or more initial variables is set in motion, we can predict that certain patterns will eventually emerge) and unpredictability (although patterns will emerge, we cannot precisely predict what outcome will happen at what time, if ever).

The rules of chaos (that’s not a contradictory statement) result in similarly confounding realities. Gleick quotes mathematician Arthur Lorenz, one of the founders of chaos theory and the person who coined the term “the butterfly effect,” saying: “We might have trouble forecasting the temperature of [this cup of] coffee one minute in advance, but we should have little difficulty in forecasting it an hour ahead.” That is, we know the coffee’s temperature will eventually equilibriate with the room and air temperature. But between now and then, the forces of convection, cooling and friction are so complicated and chaotic, it’s impossible to predict exactly what will happen in the first minute.

It would take thousands of words to adequately describe all the features of chaos that Gleick manages to illuminate in the book. But his most profound contribution is in helping the reader understand something intuitive: “Our feeling for beauty is inspired by the harmonious arrangement of order and disorder as it occurs in natural objects–in clouds, trees, mountain ranges, or snow crystals. The shapes of all these are dynamical processes jelled into physical forms,” explains physicist Gert Eilenberger, and those dynamical processes are chaotic, with all the beautiful fractal patterns associated with them. The structure of snowflakes, of seashells, of the Milky Way, of whirlpools and fingerprints, all these owe their beauty and form to chaos theory.

Very few writers can translate difficult science into readable and fascinating prose like Gleick. As far as I can tell, both the scientists he interviews and the reading public feel he is on “their” side and I think they’re both right. Like the mathematical foundation of the theory itself, Chaos is a beautiful and profound book that helped me reconsider physics, philosophy and the universe itself.

Gleick captures both the concrete details of this science along with the revelatory and emotional resonance the discovery of chaos theory has had on the people who work in the field. “It’s an experience like no other I can describe,” said physicist Leo Kadanoff, “the best thing that can happen to a scientist, realizing that something that’s happened in his or her own mind exactly corresponds to something that happens in nature. It’s startling every time it occurs… A great shock, and a great, great joy.” Which was exactly my experience of reading this book.

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  1. By Timothy on June 9, 2014 at 5:15 am

    .

    tnx for info.

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